Foursquare Stalking is a Competitive Sport

More foursquare news.  Interesting video from my Twitter buddy Dave Kerpen’s KBuzz group.  Bit on the long side, due to the repeating chorus, but still makes its point.

True foursquare addiction means that you can track your friends’ every move. I have learned a few interesting things from my small, but mighty friend list:

  • The economy must be rebounding because my friends seem to be eating out every night
  • Kroger seems to be the grocer of choice
  • Most of my friends check in at a house of worship on Sundays
  • 25% of my group want privacy and go off the grid for large chunks of time
  • I know who is away on vacation by their remote check-ins during this holiday week (mums the word!)
  • Majority of check-ins have to do with food venues

Still unnerved by the unknown people who send me a friend request on foursquare.  Keep thinking, are they Facebooking it and just trying to add me to their mountain of friends, or are there people who don’t know me personally, but want to stalk me from afar??  For now, I think that’s just down right CREEPY! What do you think?

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3 thoughts on “Foursquare Stalking is a Competitive Sport”

  1. Michelle,

    What caught my eye here is your use of the word “creepy.” I’m not a Foursquarer and don’t plan to be one, but I do receive a number of “creepy” DMs on Twitter. And they really do “creep” me out. What do you say about accepting friend requests for a professional/business FB accout from those that you don’t know? What if those folks are “friends” of some of your “real” business “friends?”

    Thanks,
    Roger

    1. Roger,

      Thanks for the comments. In answer to your question about Facebook, it truly comes down to the strategy that you adopt for the Page. A traditional business account, known as a Fan Page, allows anyone to join without being accepted by the Page Administrator. There are ways to remove or block unwanted Fans for cause after they have joined if necessary. Personal Facebook Pages allow you to accept or ignore friend requests. If someone is using a personal page for business purposes, then my guess would be that the owner of the page would welcome most friend requests, even if they were initially unknown individuals, because it would be surmised that the “business page” had some type of call to action in which maximizing connections would be a plus. Would be happy to discuss further. (You can check out a post on my personal strategy for Facebook here: https://michellebeckham.wordpress.com/2009/12/28/facebook-christmas/ )

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